A Look At Where The Smart Phone Industry Is Headed In 2012.

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A look at where the smart phone industry is heading in 2012 shows us that it will be the year of advancement and universality in combining smart phones, personal electronic gadgets and home entertainment control and use under one umbrella. Whether owning Apple, Nexus or Google, the more popular smart phone suppliers at the moment, smart phone owners will be snatched as soon as they are released. The growing number and exciting improvement in the usabiltiy of the applications (apps) is only just beginning, and 2010 may just be know as "the year of the apps".
The new electronics gear and apps that these entertainment giants are soon to be stocking the shelves and the Google Apps Store, recently changed to reflect their wares more properly to "The Android Apps Market", are mostly designed to make life easier for the smart phone owner. 2012 will also be the year that smart phone suppliers and carriers will make the customer priority number one, as opposed to making gouging the customers priority number one.
The smart phone sindustry is also headed into the home entertinment industry, with televisions being included in their wares in the not-so-distant future. With a good lock on a sizeable share of the personal telecommunications business, both Apple and Google have television sets in their sights, with Apple seemingly the first to get theirs to market in late 2010 or early 2011.
At the moment, Google has a set-top box that is used for changing your television into a multimedia display, but a television set is in their future, and should be announced in early- to mid-2010. Sony will be making a giant leap into the market in 2010, with a smart phone and an applications (apps) network, which will make a smart phone even smarter, or turn your home into a smart home. 2010 will see Sony trying to get back to the top of the home entertainment industry, as well as the personal telecommunications industry.
With more players recently added, and even more soon to be added to the personal telecommunications service markets, new cell phone carriers will be focusing their on making their products compliant with either the Android or the Windows platforms. The consumer will be the one to benefit the most from advancements in 2010, as the way we buy smart phones is changing, as well as the way we pick and choose our carriers.
Following the lead of the Nexus One smart phone and network, where the consumer picks the smart phone they like, and then select the carrier and plan that best suits them, most carriers will be offering more personalized monthly plans. The process of buying the plan and then the phone is going the way of the Dodo bird.
The day of the generic smart phone carrier plan will soon come to an end, and 2010 seems like it could be the year to see more consumer benefits finally implemented. Gone will be the days of buying a service plan, and getting the phone for free or at a greatly reduced price as long as a three-year plan is signed. As people are finally seeing through the greediness of the current batch of smart phone carriers, they may be induced into changing carriers, and trying out one of the newer players.
2010 will see more transparency and fewer hidden fees, if any, as will the extra fees for extra bandwidth use disappear; the consumer will be given carrier plans that have full disclosure up front. A cell phone service plan that is advertised at $34.95 will cost you $34.95, and no longer approach the $70 mark.
With the release of the Google and Motorola combined endeavour in the Droid smart phone, and it's quick successor, the Motorola Devour, as well as the Nexus One and other well made, easy to use smart phones, the future of the smart phone is now, and 2010 will see refinements, an increase in the clarity of calls and the reduction of dropped calls and static interference. Not only will consumers be able to select the phone that they want and then pick their carrier and plan, but they will be able to return smart phones and get a major portion of what they spent on it back towards any upgrades on their chosen models of smart phones.
It seems that the most irritating thing about smart phones lately is the relatively short battery life, and the fact that the smart phones that they buy become obsolete within months of buying their fancy new gadgets. Batteries will be introduced that have significantly longer lasting stand-by and operating times. As well, service providers will be allowing the consumer to exchange their smart phones for newer models by the same manufacturer within three to six months of the original purchase date, if the newer models outshine or replace the model they purchased. 2010 will also see the end of the days of buying the newest and fanciest smart phone to be released, only to see it be replaced by a better model within a few months, as the Devour replaced the Droid.
2010 seems like it is going to be a banner year for smart phones, and for putting them in as many hands as possible. Smart phones will no longer be for the business class, nor for the relatively well-off, but be accessible to people from all walks of life. For example, the Nexus One is currently selling in the $500 to $600 range, when purchased without a carrier plan. When purchased with a three-year plan, that price drops to from about a hundred dollars to almost, if not, free. However, with the cost of the service plan included over the three-year period, as compared to the cost of the phone while using a selected carrier and plan, as well as the option to use pay-as-you-go, the handset prices are actually very competitive.
However, 2010 may also be the year that the consumer finally comes to their senses and stops buying each new smart phone as they come to market. Knowing full well that the prices will be dropping relatively soon, consumers may be waiting for the manufacturers to come down to their price range before buying smart phones. Without being tied down to three-year plans that are heavy on extra bandwidth and other hidden and extra fees, the consumer will be saving money. Money which they can now spend on accessories and not-for-free apps for their smart phones.
2010 may finally be the year of the consumer. Shop smart, shop informed.A look at where the smart phone industry is heading in 2010 shows us that it will be the year of advancement and universality in combining smart phones, personal electronic gadgets and home entertainment control and use under one umbrella. Whether owning Apple, Nexus or Google, the more popular smart phone suppliers at the moment, smart phone owners will be snatched as soon as they are released. The growing number and exciting improvement in the usabiltiy of the applications (apps) is only just beginning, and 2010 may just be know as "the year of the apps".
The new electronics gear and apps that these entertainment giants are soon to be stocking the shelves and the Google Apps Store, recently changed to reflect their wares more properly to "The Android Apps Market", are mostly designed to make life easier for the smart phone owner. 2010 will also be the year that smart phone suppliers and carriers will make the customer priority number one, as opposed to making gouging the customers priority number one.
The smart phone sindustry is also headed into the home entertinment industry, with televisions being included in their wares in the not-so-distant future. With a good lock on a sizeable share of the personal telecommunications business, both Apple and Google have television sets in their sights, with Apple seemingly the first to get theirs to market in late 2010 or early 2011.
At the moment, Google has a set-top box that is used for changing your television into a multimedia display, but a television set is in their future, and should be announced in early- to mid-2010. Sony will be making a giant leap into the market in 2010, with a smart phone and an applications (apps) network, which will make a smart phone even smarter, or turn your home into a smart home. 2010 will see Sony trying to get back to the top of the home entertainment industry, as well as the personal telecommunications industry.
With more players recently added, and even more soon to be added to the personal telecommunications service markets, new cell phone carriers will be focusing their on making their products compliant with either the Android or the Windows platforms. The consumer will be the one to benefit the most from advancements in 2010, as the way we buy smart phones is changing, as well as the way we pick and choose our carriers.
Following the lead of the Nexus One smart phone and network, where the consumer picks the smart phone they like, and then select the carrier and plan that best suits them, most carriers will be offering more personalized monthly plans. The process of buying the plan and then the phone is going the way of the Dodo bird.
The day of the generic smart phone carrier plan will soon come to an end, and 2010 seems like it could be the year to see more consumer benefits finally implemented. Gone will be the days of buying a service plan, and getting the phone for free or at a greatly reduced price as long as a three-year plan is signed. As people are finally seeing through the greediness of the current batch of smart phone carriers, they may be induced into changing carriers, and trying out one of the newer players.
2010 will see more transparency and fewer hidden fees, if any, as will the extra fees for extra bandwidth use disappear; the consumer will be given carrier plans that have full disclosure up front. A cell phone service plan that is advertised at $34.95 will cost you $34.95, and no longer approach the $70 mark.
With the release of the Google and Motorola combined endeavour in the Droid smart phone, and it's quick successor, the Motorola Devour, as well as the Nexus One and other well made, easy to use smart phones, the future of the smart phone is now, and 2010 will see refinements, an increase in the clarity of calls and the reduction of dropped calls and static interference. Not only will consumers be able to select the phone that they want and then pick their carrier and plan, but they will be able to return smart phones and get a major portion of what they spent on it back towards any upgrades on their chosen models of smart phones.
It seems that the most irritating thing about smart phones lately is the relatively short battery life, and the fact that the smart phones that they buy become obsolete within months of buying their fancy new gadgets. Batteries will be introduced that have significantly longer lasting stand-by and operating times. As well, service providers will be allowing the consumer to exchange their smart phones for newer models by the same manufacturer within three to six months of the original purchase date, if the newer models outshine or replace the model they purchased. 2010 will also see the end of the days of buying the newest and fanciest smart phone to be released, only to see it be replaced by a better model within a few months, as the Devour replaced the Droid.
2010 seems like it is going to be a banner year for smart phones, and for putting them in as many hands as possible. Smart phones will no longer be for the business class, nor for the relatively well-off, but be accessible to people from all walks of life. For example, the Nexus One is currently selling in the $500 to $600 range, when purchased without a carrier plan. When purchased with a three-year plan, that price drops to from about a hundred dollars to almost, if not, free. However, with the cost of the service plan included over the three-year period, as compared to the cost of the phone while using a selected carrier and plan, as well as the option to use pay-as-you-go, the handset prices are actually very competitive.
However, 2010 may also be the year that the consumer finally comes to their senses and stops buying each new smart phone as they come to market. Knowing full well that the prices will be dropping relatively soon, consumers may be waiting for the manufacturers to come down to their price range before buying smart phones. Without being tied down to three-year plans that are heavy on extra bandwidth and other hidden and extra fees, the consumer will be saving money. Money which they can now spend on accessories and not-for-free apps for their smart phones.
2010 may finally be the year of the consumer. Shop smart, shop informed.
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